Suomen ylioppilaskuntien liitto

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  • Press release 22.1.2016

    The Executive Board of the National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL) has appointed Iiris Niinikoski, Bachelor of Arts (Education), Communication Ninja. The communication ninja will be responsible for coordinating and developing SYL’s communication. Niinikoski succeeds Communication Officer Riitta Käppi.

    Iiris Niinikoski was the Vice-President of SYL’s Executive Board in 2015 with the parliamentary elections and communications as their area of responsibility. They were also the Vice-President of the board of the Student Union of the University of Helsinki in 2014, in charge of coordinating lobbying, particularly in connection with the parliamentary elections. Niinikoski has worked a project secretary at SYL and has held several other positions of trust both at university and in the student movement. Advantageous for Niinikoski’s were especially their excellent vision for how to develop SYL’s communication, their significant experience of communication tools as well as their competence in the field of lobby communication.

    Niinikoski studies Education at the University of Helsinki and has now commenced their work as Communication Coordinator at SYL.

     

  • Significant changes are afoot in the field of health care. They are not only connected to the social and health care reform planned by the Government. Rather more significant changes will be brought by the accelerating development towards digital health care services.

    One thing is sure, and that is that especially the younger generations, the ‘digital natives’, will challenge current solutions in health care and demand both functioning as well as more digital health care solutions.

    Eric Topol, a pioneer in digital health care, in their book The Creative Destruction of Medicine describes in a convincing way how health care practices will change. In the future, you do not have to physically go to the doctor’s office, but instead your smartphone will become a tool for examination. From the phone, information will be sent for analysis to your physician and in return you get a diagnosis and, if needed, a prescription. Topol suggests a new division of labour for the health care sector where nurses become increasingly important in assisting patients and interpreting information regarding their health. In the future, citizens participate more actively in the care by, for instance, using different instruments for measurement and phone apps.

    The Finnish Student Health Service (FSHS) has continuously received positive feedback on its digital services from a most demanding target group, university students. FSHS has also been an innovator in Finnish health care as it has introduced digital services. FSHS already uses and provides a number of digital services. These are continuously developed, for example, in distance doctor’s practices and consultations.

    Already since 2009, FSHS has used an online form for the medical examination of new students, totalling around 15,000 annually. An impact assessment by Sitra in 2015 found that digital solutions makes the operations of FSHS considerably more effective and saves the time of students as well as professionals. At the same time, directing services to those who most need them has also improved. Users have in their turn felt that the new services have made access to health care easier.

    The digitalisation of health care should in the future be seen first and foremost as an opportunity to develop new ways of providing service and as an opportunity to free up the competent and educated professional in health care for their own core competencies and what is most important of all: care and advice.

    Turkka Sinisalo

    The writer is SYL’s social policy adviser in social and health care affairs.

     

  • 2015 was an eventful year for students. As we are all well aware of, the Finnish Government decided on cutbacks for several hundred million euro in education, and we are still waiting to see what the consequences will be.

    Year 2016 promises to be as eventful. This is the year is when what was decided last year will be implemented. In addition, there are other substantial long term development processes going on.

    This year, the decisions will be made on how to implement the cuts to student financial aid as well as the on the implementation of tuition fees for students from outside the EU and EEA countries.  Policies on the development of the social and health care reform (Sote reform) will also be made and entail finding how and where to fit in student health care. The field of higher education is turned upside down as projects with the objective of joining traditional universities and universities of applied sciences or bringing them closer to each other advance in different parts of Finland. There is an unprecedented number of immigrants to find a place in education for and integrate.

    The student movement needs to play a number of diverse roles this year. We need to both speak up for education and culture, while at the same time seeing farther into the future than anyone else. Let’s get to know each other and keep relations warm. Everyone’s contribution and visions are needed this year.

    Heikki

     

  • In what light do international students and youth see Finland? Racism is present every day and asylum seekers fear fire bomb strikes. To get even get an interview when applying for a job, you often need to be fluent in Finnish and have a Finnish-sounding name. The bureaucracy is difficult to master.
    Shuo Wang and Osama Alaloulou wrote well on the topic in the Finnish newspaper Helsingin Sanomat in a letter to the Editor on 10 January 2016. International students would like to stay in Finland, but it has been made very difficult for them. In 2012, when the University of Helsinki conducted a study on international graduate employability and barriers to finding jobs, 86% of respondents perceived lacking skills in Finnish or Swedish to be a barrier. Other obstacles included the lack of networks (51%), discrimination based on ethnicity during recruitment (32%), and insufficient career counseling at the higher education institutions (26%).

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  • 151121_SYL_kuva_liittokokous_hallitus2016_540x343px_nettisivuille (ID 10194)

    7 January 2016

    The Executive Board 2016 of the National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL) has held its constitutive meeting and divided areas of responsibilities.

    The board also decided on the respective sponsored student unions (Fi. “kummi”). In adherence with good traditions, SYL has kept in touch on a regular basis with our member corporations, the university student unions.  Each board member is appointed sponsored member unions, for whom they serve as a sort of godparent. This makes it easier for officers of the student unions to contact their sponsor in the SYL executive board with whatever is on their mind.

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    Job advertisement 11.12.2015

    Long to work with societal lobbying? Top professional or rising star in communication? Like developing and spur other to ever improving performances? Can write a press release on any topic while sharing Snaps on Snapchat? You might be just the communicator we are looking for.

    We are looking for a communication ninja for our team.  In this permanent position, you are in charge of planning our communication and other related tasks. In the future, we would like to further develop our online and social media presence, how we measure our effectiveness and profitability as well as the reach of our communication. Your tasks also include coordinating the communications team: in spring, we hope to recruit also an art director undergoing non-military service as well as potentially starting a communications trainee programme.

    » Read more

  • Press release 30.11.2015

    All over Finland, university student unions and students celebrate the Free Education Day on Monday 30 November 2015. Finnish students consider free education an important part of the Finnish welfare state and education equality. The student movement supports free education for all, regardless of nationality. During the Free Education Day, student unions campaign for free education on social media under the hashtag #maksutonkoulutus #FreeEducation.

    ‘For students, every day is a free education day. Once a year we also want to remind other stakeholders about how important tuition-free education is for the welfare of Finnish society,’ says president Jari Järvenpää from the National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL).

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  • Resolution 21 November 2015

    The National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL) stresses the importance of education for both youth with immigrant background as well as refugees in Finland. SYL demands that the Finnish Government takes action and ensures adequate resources for increasing education potential.

    The small proportion of students with an immigrant background of all higher education students in Finland is a disgrace. The Eurostudent survey puts Finland on par with e.g. Hungary and Romania in access to higher education for youth with an immigrant background. We find this alarming, since an equal and accessible education is the cornerstone of Finnish society. Students should better mirror the demography of Finland.

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  • 20151121_174904Press release 21.11.2015

    The General Assembly of the National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL), representing all of Finland’s close to 132,000 university students, has elected the 2016 executive board. The meeting also decided on next year’s plan of work.

    The meeting elected as president Bachelor of Technology Heikki Koponen, 24, from Aalto University Student Union (AYY).

    The General Assembly also elected six board members:

    Alviina Alametsä (Student Union of the University of Helsinki HYY)
    Ella Keski-Panula (Student Union of the University of Helsinki HYY)
    Annu Komulainen (Student Union of the University of Jyväskylä JYY)
    Tuomas Kuoppala (Student Union of the University of Tampere (TamY)
    Mia Lehto (Finnish Centre Students KOL, student union LTKY)
    Siiri Nousiainen (Student Union of the University of Oulu OYY)

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  • Press release 17.11.2015

    The two day General Assembly of the National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL) will be held in Korpilampi, Espoo on Friday and Saturday 20–21 November. The General Assembly wields the highest decision making power in SYL and elects a new president and executive board of six for the organisation. The meeting also outlines the objectives for and activities of SYL in 2016.

    The meeting opens Friday at 10 in the morning. On Saturday, the meeting continues at 9.30 in the morning, with a speech by Sanni Grahn-Laasonen, Minister of Culture and Education, at 11. Late Saturday afternoon is the high point of the General Assembly when the results from the elections for president and board are announced around 16–17. We will send the media information on the results as soon as we can after the elections.

    All 15 university student unions in Finland are represented at the General Assembly. All in all, the unions represent around 132,000 university students. The student unions select 142 full representatives to the General Assembly. Altogether the number of participants is around 300.

    There are three candidates for the post as president: Heikki Koponen (AYY), Mikko Mononen (TYY), and Siiri Nousiainen (OYY).

    There are currently six other candidates for the six posts as member of the executive board. The candidates nominated by the student unions are: Ella Keski-Panula (HYY), Mikael Kinanen (ArtSU), Annu Komulainen (JYY), and Tuomas Kuoppala (Tamy). Additionally, the student wing of the Centre Party (KOL) and the youth and student wing of the Green Party have nominated one candidate each for the board. KOL’s candidate is Mia Lehto and ViNO’s candidate is Alviina Alametsä. Candidates may be nominated until the elections take place during the General Assembly. Find links to presentations of the candidates at the end of this section.

    » Read more

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  • In what light do international students and youth see Finland? Racism is present every day and asylum seekers fear fire bomb strikes. To get even get an interview when applying for a job, you often need to be fluent in Finnish and have a Finnish-sounding name. The bureaucracy is difficult to master.
    Shuo Wang and Osama Alaloulou wrote well on the topic in the Finnish newspaper Helsingin Sanomat in a letter to the Editor on 10 January 2016. International students would like to stay in Finland, but it has been made very difficult for them. In 2012, when the University of Helsinki conducted a study on international graduate employability and barriers to finding jobs, 86% of respondents perceived lacking skills in Finnish or Swedish to be a barrier. Other obstacles included the lack of networks (51%), discrimination based on ethnicity during recruitment (32%), and insufficient career counseling at the higher education institutions (26%).

    » Jatka lukemista

  • 151121_SYL_kuva_liittokokous_hallitus2016_540x343px_nettisivuille (ID 10194)

    7 January 2016

    The Executive Board 2016 of the National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL) has held its constitutive meeting and divided areas of responsibilities.

    The board also decided on the respective sponsored student unions (Fi. “kummi”). In adherence with good traditions, SYL has kept in touch on a regular basis with our member corporations, the university student unions.  Each board member is appointed sponsored member unions, for whom they serve as a sort of godparent. This makes it easier for officers of the student unions to contact their sponsor in the SYL executive board with whatever is on their mind.

    » Jatka lukemista

  • Student admissions are being announced and student organisations are worried about the transfers between upper secondary education and tertiary education as well as transfers between higher education institutions. Currently, transfer paths are not working well, which makes it harder for students to commence their studies and also affects the study flow.

    » Jatka lukemista

  • Statement 2.8.2011

    The National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL) urges universities to pay attention to the integration of first-year students into the student community and to how they take on their studies.

    » Jatka lukemista

  • Statement 2.8.2011

    The National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL) urges universities to pay attention to the integration of first-year students into the student community and to how they take on their studies.

    » Jatka lukemista

  • “SYL: Ei pitene ilman nuoria”
    “FSF: Inte längre utan unga”

    Statement 12.7.2011 (suomeksi / på svenska)
    For immediate release

    SYL: No further without the young

    » Jatka lukemista

  • Tasa-arvon toteuduttava myös rakkaudessa

    “Opiskelija- ja nuorisojärjestöt: Tasa-arvon toteuduttava myös rakkaudessa”
    “Student- och ungdomsorganisationerna: Även kärleken ska vara jämlik”

    Statement 30.6.2011 (suomeksi / på svenska)

    » Jatka lukemista

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  • In what light do international students and youth see Finland? Racism is present every day and asylum seekers fear fire bomb strikes. To get even get an interview when applying for a job, you often need to be fluent in Finnish and have a Finnish-sounding name. The bureaucracy is difficult to master.
    Shuo Wang and Osama Alaloulou wrote well on the topic in the Finnish newspaper Helsingin Sanomat in a letter to the Editor on 10 January 2016. International students would like to stay in Finland, but it has been made very difficult for them. In 2012, when the University of Helsinki conducted a study on international graduate employability and barriers to finding jobs, 86% of respondents perceived lacking skills in Finnish or Swedish to be a barrier. Other obstacles included the lack of networks (51%), discrimination based on ethnicity during recruitment (32%), and insufficient career counseling at the higher education institutions (26%).

    In Canada, for instance, similar problems have been addressed by combining language instruction, mentoring, and traineeship programmes. Thanks to this, Canada has achieved an 80% employment rate among international students. Also anonymous job application procedures would ensure more equality. For instance, the Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluation found that the probability of advancing to interviews increased by 50 per cent for individuals of non-Western origin when applications were handled anonymously. Wand and Alaloulou also propose, for example, that students who have completed a Master’s degree would be granted a permanent residence permit. All students do not necessarily stay in Finland, and that is also positive: Finland can efficiently further global development when experts who have received a high-quality education in Finland go back and develop their home countries. One example of this is the Somali presidential candidate Fadumo Dayib, who was educated in Finland.
    Students also want to further employment. In the years 2016–2017, the National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL), will work on a project with the objective of creating more traineeship options, communicate about the potential of international students, and collecting information about successful pilots. True internationalisation is a prerequisite for competitiveness and education export. We want to challenge all higher education institutions, labour market organisations and Finnish society to welcome internationalisation – it pays off.

    Alviina Alametsä, SYL (International education politics, development co-operation, employment affairs)
    Gramoz Shpendi, SAMOK (International education politics, organizations, equality)

    1 VALOA-hankeselvitys “Employability of International Graduates Educated in Finnish Higher Education Institutions” (2012)Helsingin yliopisto, urapalvelut
    2 Åslund & Skans 2007: Do anonymous job application procedures level the playing field?, Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluation, Working paper 2007:31, http://www.ifau.se/upload/pdf/se/2007/wp07-31.pdf
    3 VALOA-hankeselvitys “Employability of International Graduates Educated in Finnish Higher Education Institutions” (2012)Helsingin yliopisto, urapalvelut

    kadulla3Gramoz Shpendi

  • 151121_SYL_kuva_liittokokous_hallitus2016_540x343px_nettisivuille (ID 10194)

    7 January 2016

    The Executive Board 2016 of the National Union of University Students in Finland (SYL) has held its constitutive meeting and divided areas of responsibilities.

    The board also decided on the respective sponsored student unions (Fi. “kummi”). In adherence with good traditions, SYL has kept in touch on a regular basis with our member corporations, the university student unions.  Each board member is appointed sponsored member unions, for whom they serve as a sort of godparent. This makes it easier for officers of the student unions to contact their sponsor in the SYL executive board with whatever is on their mind.

    Areas of responsibility and sponsored student unions:

    Heikki Koponen, president, tel. 044 906 5007

    Siiri Nousiainen, vice president, communications (OYY, VYY)

    Alviina Alametsä, international education policy, development cooperation, working life (TYY, Snellman University, ÅAS)

    Ella Keski-Panula, social policy: student health care, housing, municipal elections (HYY, LYY)

    Annu Komulainen, social policy: student finances, environment, wellbeing, equality incl. language (JYY, ISYY)

    Tuomas Kuoppala, education policy: higher education structures, education export (Tamy, TTYY, SHS)

    Mia Lehto, education policy: digitalisation and year-round studies, study ability and associations (AYY, LTKY, ArtSU)

    Email addresses in the formfirstname.surname@syl.fi. Phone numbers will be confirmed shortly.

    Additional information: President Heikki Koponen, +358 44 906 5007

  • Student admissions are being announced and student organisations are worried about the transfers between upper secondary education and tertiary education as well as transfers between higher education institutions. Currently, transfer paths are not working well, which makes it harder for students to commence their studies and also affects the study flow.

    Of the age group finishing upper secondary education, 70 per cent apply to higher education – but only 32 per cent are successful in their first application.  Reasons for gap years between secondary and tertiary education include conscription, not being accepted to your study place of choice, and general insecurity about what to study. The quotas recently introduced in student admission may relieve the problem, although there is no evidence of their effect yet.

    In addition to transfers between secondary and tertiary education, there are also transfers between and within higher education institutions.  We should not punish students for having failed in their choice of education; instead we should offer them the opportunity to transfer to an education more to their liking.  The study path is to be continuous and students’ eligibility for continuing education is not to be weakened. Both the student and the educational institution are left idling when a student discontinues their studies. Flexible transfers ensure that it is possible for students to reorient themselves and smoothly continue their studies.

    Good student counselling at all stages of studying ensures the possibility of flexible transfers both between secondary and higher education, as well as within and between higher education institutions. Students need to have sufficient knowledge and a realistic view of education and their livelihood as students in order to make the right choices when applying. For students transferring within and between higher education institutions, flexible modes for applying to a new education should be made available. We call for higher education institutions to make sure the above is realised.

    Finland needs diversified knowledge both currently and in the future. We must make sure that each and every one has the opportunity for self-development, lifelong learning, and maintaining their relevance for the labour market relevance. The education system must make it possible for as many as possible to educate themselves, in different stages of their lives.

    Contact details:
    President Musa Jallow (SAKKI) tel. +358 44 082 4221, firstname.surname@sakkinet.fi
    President Jari Järvenpää (SYL), tel. +358 44 906 5007, firstname.surname@syl.fi
    President Tatu Koivisto (SLL), tel. +358 50 431 4995, firstname.surname@lukio.fi
    President Kimi Merikukka (OSKU), tel. +358 44 977 6356, firstname.surname@osku.info
    President Joonas Peltonen (SAMOK), tel. +358 50 389 1000, firstname.surname@samok.fi

     

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